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Compendium of Herbs & Herbal preparations

This is the Online WorldHerbs® Formulary (and also my "thesis" for my doctoral work in Naturopathic Medicine). This has been an ongoing lesson herbal lore that has been in the works for over 10 years. This site is FREE for private/ commercial research. Contact us if you would like to use any content for use other than printing sections to show your physician. I´ve included herbs found in American, American Indian, Ayurvedic/ Indian, Asian, TCM, African, Australian / New Zealand native medicinals, Pan Asian, German Commission E recommendations & advisories; & all other countries´ /cultures´ formulae. If I´ve missed any, if there are other names that you know these herbs by; in ANY language; or you know of one or another that I should address. Please please email the herbalist.

Herbs are used to aid in the healing of wounds, illness; they serve as a preventative to sickness as well as to maintain human & animal well being. More herbs are added every few weeks. Come back & visit us. Definitions can also be found at ebay on our storefront to explain the various ingredients in the products.

Herbs tend to fall into categories which describe general attributes. I will try to keep these general attributes close to the front of each definition. Note The herbs themselves may treat something in exact opposite of their general category...such as a Stimulant that is also a Nervine due to its Diuretic nature.

Be advised that if an herb is normalized to Africa; the listing will mention that. If it is an herb found in certain "old fashioned" country names; I will put what I knew to be their names when I initially found the herb...However in today´s rapidly changing political scene; you may have to be somewhat forgiving about the place names.

Chinese Herbs (Asian): Will include the Chinese/Asian names plus our latin name plus where & what it benefits -No Asian Herbs should be taken without the advice of either a registered TCM or Asian Herbal Pharmacist´s advice. These herbs treat the whole body in a completely different medical mindset. See TCM for more details on this truely Alternate Therapy.

» There are many references to "TCM" which is an abreviation for "Traditional Chinese Medicine".

Categories

[ Anti-biotic ]   [ Anti-Inflam. ]   [ Astringent ]   [ Calmnative ]   [ Digestif ]   [ Diuretic ]   [ Energizer ]   [ Expectorant ]   [ Nervine ]   [ Tonic ]   [ TCM ]

Herbs Listing for - Diuretic - page 2 of 3
Chicory
Other Names: Hendibeh, Barbe de Capucin, Cichorium intybus Region: Mediterranean
Description: Other alternative names: Succory, Wild succory, Endive, Garden endive, Wild Chicory. Egyption, Greek & Roman herb. Potherb. Roots & young shoots used. Used an an alternative to coffee in the southern states during the civil war & beyond. Added to regular coffee in those states for a "bitter" taste that makes some feel better. Sugar, 58% inulin and an unnamed bitter element, vitamins, minerals. Tonic, Nervine, Diuretic. Flower tea makes sedative. Chicory was cultivated in ancient Egypt for its culinary and medicinal qualities, and is mentioned in ancient Greek literature. The leaves are similar to dandelion greens, and the root is dried, roasted and added to beverages. The French added it to coffee to subdue the stimulating effects of caffeine. Thomas Jefferson used the plant for ground cover, livestock fodder and salad greens. Chicory grows wild throughout North America, but was introduced in colonial times.
Uses: Tea and juice from the plant flowers and leaves are recommended for disorders of the digestive tract. Also induces bile production and frees gallstones. Diuretic: Chicory increases the production of urine. Laxative: Chicory aids in relieving constipation. Chicory is know to treat Jaundice, disorders of the spleen, inflammations of the skin. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Cleavers
Other Names: Goose Grass, Coachweed, , Galium aparine Region: Mediterranean
Description: Other alternative names: Bedstraw, Catchweed, Clabber Grass, Clivers, Cleavers, Cleaverwort, Gravel Grass, Grip Grass,Goose Hair, Gosling Weed, Hedge Burrs, Milk Sweet, Poor Robin, Loveman, Stick-a-Back, Sweethearts, Savoyan, Scratchweed Active compounds: Iridoids, alkanes, flavonoids, tannins, polyphenolic acids, and anthraquinones. Greek physicians used it to treat weariness and the stems were used by shephards to strain milk.
Uses: Juice or infusion used. Applied to skin eruptions & diseases; it reduces inflammation. Cleavers is used primarily for external application on skin irritations, such as burns and to stop bleeding. This is achieved by making a salve out of the herb or using the juice of the plant topically.The juice is also turned into a tea, which can be dried and applied topically or consumed to help with stomach ailments and intestinal problems or to alleviate mucous membranes. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Club Moss, Chinese
Other Names: Wolf's Claw, Vegetable sulfer, Huperzia serrata Region: Asian
Description: TCM medicinal herb. Other Latin names: Licopodium {American}. Other Alternative names: Muscis Terrestris repens. Active compounds: Alkaloids, flavenoids, polyphenols, and triterpenes. Anti-aging. May work against effects of Alzeheimer's disease, gout, scurvy, muscle spasms, and rheumatism. Chippewa American Indian herb used for effects of Aging. Inhibits breakdown of acetylcholine; a neurotransmitter in the brain. Adds choline to the brain. Club moss is found worldwide now, but is most common in Great Britain. Spore collection happens in July and August. The tops of the plants are cut off and shaken to release yellow spores. Club Moss has relieved digestive and kidney problems since ancient times and was used to eliminate kidney stones, as well as used as a diuretic. Club moss spores are hyrdrophobic and are very resistant to water. That makes them ideal for coating medicine tablets. They're also used in fireworks because of their ability to explode when burned.
Uses: Club moss eases indigestion and reduces gastric inflammation. It is a diuretic, can help in treating chronic kidney issues as well as reduce dropsy and edema. Club moss spores can be dusted onto the skin and provide relief from itch and irritation. They can also be used to keep the skin dry and protected. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Cornflower
Other Names: Bachelor's button, basket flow, Centaurea cyanus Region: Amer_Indian
Description: Leaves/flowers used. Other alternative names: Bachelor's button, bouttonniere flower. Active compounds: anthocyanins (anthocyanidin glycosides), sesquiterpene lactone: cnicin, as well as polyacetylenes and flavonoids. Its Latin name, Cyanus, comes from mythology for a youthful devotee of the goddess Flora (Cyanus), whose favorite flower it was. Tte name of the genus is derived from the Centaur, Chiron, who taught humankind the healing virtue of herbs. Magical properties:"A decoction of the petals, filtered through three layers of linen and ritually consecrated beneath a full moon with a moonstone, were used as an eye bath for increasing clairvoyance : enabling one to see aspects of the universal creative forces." Listed in the French Pharmacopoeia since 1884.
Uses: Infusion or decoction or tea. Used as a Calmnative for stress/nervous disorders. Eyewash for weak eyes. Ophthalmic, mildly purgative, tonic, and stimulant. Internal uses: Improves digestion, regulates gall bladder, liver and kidneys. Beneficial in treating menstrual problems. Increases resistance to infections. External use: Used for washing out wounds. It is used with great success in ulcerations of the mouth and skin.mouth ulcers. Used for corneal ulcers, conjunctivitis and minor eye wounds. It has antibacterial, antioxidant properties and appears, as does eyebright, in products for eye health. Soothes inflamed, irritated skin. It is added to shampoos and hair products. Used in ophthalmology and to treat the area around the eyes. It has astringent properties and also has an antioxidant effect on the skin. It has been used to give eyes a bright sparkling look. A steam-facial of the petals improves look and health of skin. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Cornsilk
Other Names: Yu mi shu, Zea Mays Region: Asian
Description: Silky tassels of corn on the cob. Tonic, Kidney, Prostate. Diuretic. High in iron, silicon, & vitamin K which is used to clot blood. The entire corn plant has long been used in American Indian cultures for medicinal and nutritional purposes. In particular the cornsilk can be used to treat urinary disorders. Because cornsilk has such a high concentration of potassium (Vitamin K), it is a powerful diuretic. It can be used to treat many problems with the urinary tract. It is helpful for kidney stones, cystitis, and problems with urine flow. In China, cornsilk is often used to treat fluid retention and even jaundice. Research has shown that cornsilk may cause the production of bile and improve liver function. Chinese research has shown that cornsilk can also lower blood pressure and improve blood-clotting.
Uses: Cornsilk is believed to reduce the formation of kidney stones. It can also help relieve symptoms for person who already have stones. When used with other medical treatments for cystitis, cornsilk can help releive the problem. In this case, it makes a better complimentary supplement rather than a primary treatment. Corn Silk can be used to sooth the lining of the urinary tract. It can help relieve pain and difficulty with urination. Cornsilk also helps to prevent frequent urination. It also relieves fluid retention throughout the body - one contributing factor to a decrease in blood pressure. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Eryngo, Water
Other Names: Sea Holly, Eryngium planium, e competre Region: Asian
Description: As a decoction of the root in wine; it is used as a diuretic, to treat female issues. Also used to aid in snakebite & help heal broken bones. Currently eryngo is used for bladder & uterin diseases such as fibroids. One will see results if using this herb during prolonged fasting.
Uses: Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Fennel
Other Names: Finocchio, Foeniculum vulgare Region: European
Description: Seeds used. Stomach, nerves, intestines & eyes. Purifies blood, expels gas, dispels phlem from the throat. Once used as a door charm to ward off evil spirits. High in calcium, magnesium, phosphorus. Moderate in potassium. Promotes lactation. {do not use fennel oil, only the seeds. Fennel was once used as a treatment for snake bites. It was once considered a cure against witchcraft. While fennel is no longer used in those capacities, it's still considered a powerful herb for treating digestive problems. Fennel is sometimes used to enhance weight loss. It is native to the Mediterranean, but is grown all over the world.
Uses: Fennel is primarily used to treat bloating and discomfort in the digestive system. It also has uses for women's health and conjunctivitis. Eye infections: Fennel can be used to make an eyewash that helps to relieve conjunctivitis. Women's Health: Fennel can help to increase the production of breast-milk for nursing mothers. Infants: Babies can be given fennel to relieve congestion as well as colic and teething pain. Digestive System: Fennel helps to reduce bloating and stomach ache. It can also help to increase the appetite. It generally helps to improve digestion. Kidneys: Fennel is though to have diuretic properties. It can be used to treat kidney stones. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Goutweed
Other Names: , Aegopodium podograria Region: Ancient_EurAsian
Description: Pot herb, shoots & leaves used. Diuretic, Sedative. Anti-Inflammatory. Fights gout, sciatica, rheumatism, arthritis & other auto immune diseases, cleanses urinary system. High in Iron, maganese & silicon.
Uses: Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Grape Vine
Other Names: , Vineferis officialis Region: Ancient_EurAsian
Description: Leaves & Stems used. Good for the bladder, kidneys & digestive system in general. Helps eliminate excess water, reduces dropsy/edema along with regular exercise. Helps flush kidney stones.
Uses: Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Grindelia
Other Names: Gum plant, G. squarrosa, Grindelia camporum, G. humilis Region: South American
Description: Grown in the U.S & South America. Entire plant used. A decoction is used as a wash or poultice for wounds or running sores. Speeds healing of wounds. Buds & flowers made into a tea to cleanse the kidneys. Plant crushed & applied as poutice for arthritis. Fluid extract or tincture can be used to reduce effects of poison ivy & poison oak by the Cahuilla & other American Indian tribes. High in Iron, maganese & silicon.
Uses: The tea can also be drunk to slow the heartbeat, used to combat the wheezes of asthma & to use as an expectorant for bronchial complaints. Herbal Actions
Warnings: Only small doses should be used, high doses can be poisonous.
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Hops, Japanese -
Other Names: Lucao, Humulus japonicus Region: Asian
Description: Used as a Tonic for urinary & genetalia. TCM herb for TB, Typhoid, mastitis, tonsillitis. Anti-bacterial, Diuretic. Also helps reduce effects from dysentry, premature ejaculation, malaria & cystitus..
Uses: Distilled into a tincture, used as a tonic, brewed as a tea & used in ground formats in TCM pills. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Hydrangea -
Other Names: Seven Barks, Kidney Stone tea, Hydrangea arborescens Region: Amer_Indian
Description: Root used. Active Compounds include: Cyanogenic glycoside, Volatile oil, Saponins, and Flavonoids. Other Alternative Names in Spanish, Siete reices or Seven Barks. In the Amazon, hydrangea is used as part of a drink called Siete reices or Sevan Barks, which is an male aphrodisiac said to help raise the "flag". A huge amount of antioxidants call Hydrangea has a huge amount of antioxidants in it & should be used to boost the liver's capacity to cleanse & aid blood. Known for its aphrodisiacal characteristics down south of Northern America; Hydrangea is here known mostly for its use as a gall bladder & bladder stone remover, or stone buster without the pain that can be excruciating. Hydrangea is better used that some of the products for GOUT like allopurinol & other chemicals that have some nasty side effects. n the June 5, 2009 issue of Science, a team of researchers from the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Immune Disease Institute at Children's Hospital Boston and another from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine announced that hydrangea root may play a role in the treatment of a number of autoimmune disorders, including eczema, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Of particular interest is halofuginone, a molecule isolated from hydrangea root. In this particular study, the researchers found that halofuginone blocked the production of pro-inflammatory chemicals collectively referred to as cytokines. This substance also inhibited the production of Th17, a specialized immune system helper cell thought to be involved in triggering an inflammatory response that causes the immune system to mistakenly attack healthy tissue.
Uses: Tea made from bark & flowers aids in reducing size of & expelling kidney & bladder stones. Drunk as a tea or taken as a tincture on a semi-daily basis; it seems to prevent this condition from continuing. Dependant on the amount of aluminum in the soil is the color blue & dependant on the amount of lime in the soil the flowers will be pink. Frontiersmen learned of its uses from the Cherokee Indians as a cure-all. Diurectic, good for dispelling water retention. TCM practictioners use it to also counter Malaria. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Ivy-
Other Names: , Hedera helix Region: WorldWideHerb
Description: Commission E states that Ivy is good for treating bronchitis & other respiratory infections. Leaves used.
Uses: Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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Juniper -
Other Names: Ginepro, Enebro,, Juniperus communis Region: Amer_Indian
Description: Berries used. Active compounds include: Various flavonoids, catechin tannins, diterpenes, monosaccharides, pinene and limonene. Helps reduce kidney & bladder troubles. American Indians drank tea of the berries ro reduce fever & the effects of arthritis. Excellent flavoring for wild game meats such as venison, rabbit, mutton, pheasant & beef. Diuretic. An alcohol extract has been clinically studied as a use for inhibiting tumor growth in mice & in human nose & throat cultures. Restores pancreas, adrenals, diuretic, dropsy, uric acid, may help with gout. The ancient Egyptians used juniper berries imported from Greece as food and also to remedy intestinal parasites. In addition to the mention of juniper in various ancient Egyptian writings, remnants of juniper berries have been found at the tomb of Tutankhamun, better known as King Tut, which indicates the people may have also used the herb as an offering to the departed. Early Canaanites considered juniper berries a symbol of fertility & healing. They dedicated them as offerings to Ashera, the Mother Goddess and consort of El sometimes referred to as the lost goddess of Egypt and She Who Walks On (or in) the Sea.
Uses: At one time, juniper oil, or spirits of juniper, was used in veterinary medicine to treat minor skin irritations from flies and to prevent or treat dropsy in sheep. (Dropsy is an old term for edema, a condition characterized by swelling due to the accumulation of lymphatic fluid under the skin.) Excellent flavoring for wild game meats such as venison, rabbit, mutton, pheasant & beef. Also used as flavoring for gin. Herbal Actions
Warnings: None.
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